2007.1.22

Giants Practice
4-Apr-91
10 in HIGH x 8 in WIDE
(25.40 cm HIGH x 20.32 cm WIDE)
Oakland Tribune Collection, Oakland Museum of California, gift of ANG Newspapers
2007.1.22

Williams / 2X / D6 / sunspt & "giants / 4 1/4" x 5 7/8" / D-5" (handwritten in pencil on back); "Giants Practice / Matt Williams (left) and / Kevin Mitchell share a / laugh in the Infield" (handwritten in blue ink on back); "MICHAEL MACOR / APR 4 1991" (stamped on back in black ink); "FRI APR - 5 1991" (stamped in black ink onto Tribune caption affixed to back)

Black and white photograph of Matt Williams (left) and Kevin Mitchell (right). Both are wearing San Francisco Giants uniforms (white pants and black tops) and have gloves in their left hands. Williams' arms are folded. Mitchell's left arm is at his side while his right arm is on Williams' right shoulder. Williams is wearing a shin guard on his left shin. Both are looking to their left and smiling. Tribune caption affixed to back reads, "By Michael Macor/Oakland Tribune / Matt Williams, left, and Kevin Mitchell take a breather." Photograph has registration marks in the borders--some of which have been 'whited' out.

Matt Williams (baseball)From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matt_Williams_%28baseball%29 (5/3/2007)Matthew Derrick "Matt" Williams (born November 28, 1965 in Bishop, California) is a former Major League Baseball third baseman and right-handed batter who played for the San Francisco Giants (1987-96), Cleveland Indians (1997) and Arizona Diamondbacks (1998-2003).Williams was originally selected by the New York Mets out of high school but he did not sign. The Giants later drafted him out of college in the first round (3rd pick) of the 1986 amateur draft. Despite his several leg injuries and lower-back ailments, Williams was a dangerous hitter when he got the pitch he was looking for. As a third baseman, he had good reactions and excellent hands, then a quick release with an accurate and strong arm. He was one of the premier fielders at third base as he earned four gold gloves from 1991-1997.A hitter with exceptional power, six times he hit over 30 home runs with over 90 runs batted in, including his outstanding 1994 season when he hit a league-best 43 HRs with 96 RBI in a season shortened by nearly a full third due to a strike. He finished second in the league MVP vote behind Jeff Bagwell. Over a 162-game period in 1994-95, he hit 62 home runs - one more than Roger Maris had hit in his 162-game season in 1961.Matt was an original member of the Arizona Diamondbacks and holds the Diamondback record for the most runs batted in for a season with 142 in 1999 (since tied by Luis Gonzalez in 2001). Williams played in three World Series for three different teams (1989 with the Giants, 1997 with the Indians, and 2001 with the Diamondbacks) and was a member of the World Champion Arizona Diamondbacks in 2001. For his career, Williams batted .268 with 378 home runs, 1218 runs batted in, 997 runs scored, 1878 hits, 338 doubles, and 35 triples in 1866 games.Williams is now a part owner in the Diamondbacks franchise with the title of special assistant to the general partner. He occasionally serves as color commentator on Diamondbacks radio and television broadcasts, and has even assisted in coaching and player personnel matters [1]. Much of his Diamondbacks contract was deferred, which means the Diamondbacks continue to owe him about $20 million over a five-year period as of 2006.Williams has been married three times. His second wife (1999-2002) was actress Michelle Johnson. He is currently married to Erika Monroe a former TV weather anchor from KTVK-TV NewsChannel 3. They have a child together. Kevin Mitchell (baseball player)From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kevin_Mitchell_%28baseball_player%29 (5/3/2007)Kevin Darnell Mitchell (born January 13, 1962 in San Diego, California) is a former American Major League Baseball left fielder and third baseman. He became widely known not only for his occasional brilliance on the field, but also for his unpredictable and sometimes volatile behavior off the field.Mitchell was signed by the Mets as an amateur free agent in 1980, and played at six positions for their 1986 team which won the World Series. ...On July 4, 1987, Mitchell was traded to the Giants as part of a multi-player trade that also sent pitchers Dave Dravecky and Craig Lefferts to San Francisco in exchange for third baseman Chris Brown (a high school teammate) and pitchers Keith Comstock, Mark Davis, and Mark Grant. While Dravecky was initially considered to be the key to the trade for the Giants, it was Mitchell who emerged as a superstar.After two seasons playing primarily at third base, he had his best season with the Giants in 1989 upon being moved to the outfield. In that season, he batted .291 with a league-best 125 RBI and 47 home runs, leading the team to the playoffs and winning the National League's Most Valuable Player award.He set the tone for the season early in the year with an uncharacteristically excellent defensive play, making a running bare-handed catch of a fly ball to deep left field in St. Louis' Busch Stadium off of Ozzie Smith. He added a .353 average and 2 homers in the NLCS to help the team to its first World Series appearance since 1962.A two-time All-Star with the Giants, later years saw his play decline due to an often indifferent attitude as well as various other distractions. Traded to the Mariners after the 1991 season, he arrived in training camp the following year 30 pounds (14 kg) overweight. He had a resurgence in 1994 with the Reds, batting .326 with 30 HRs and 77 RBI in the strike-shortened season; but he opted to play in Japan the following year, where he became the highest-paid player in Japanese history. In Japan, he incurred the displeasure of team management when he chose to travel to the US in mid-season for knee problems against the team's wishes.In the next two years he played for four major league teams, rarely showing his former ability.After being released for the last time, he was arrested in late 1998 for assaulting his father during an argument. Back in the minor leagues in 2000, he was suspended for nine games after punching the opposing team's owner in the mouth during a brawl.

Used: Oakland Tribune

Bookmark and Share