H16.1131F

c.1880-1910
6.375 in HIGH x 9.125 in WIDE
(16.19 cm HIGH x 23.18 cm WIDE)
Northern, CA
Gift of A. W. Ericson
H16.1131F


Photographs of Indian life. "Indian sweat house, Pecwan, Hupa Tribe, Athapascan family, no. cailf." info from the OMCA green/blue "cross-file record of pictures" paper found in the museum. Image shows a wood and stone sweat house set into the earth with above ground wooden structures behind it and a dog in the background. The image has an inverse white "A.W. Ericson" stamp on lower right hand corner. The back of the photo has "Pecwan Klamath - Humboldt Co. Cala OM" written on it in pencil, "Pecwan - sweat house - Hupa tribe" written on it in black pen, "44-45" written in blue pencil, "pp 45-45 D.T. 163%" written on it in red felt tip pen, and "SEESPL INST ON POCKET" written in red pen. The photo was originally numbered 16/1131 in pen then a "C" was added in pencil and that has been overwritten with an "F" in pencil. (TKP 11/17/2010)

Picture This Information

This artifiact is part of the OMCA's Picture This website. More about the context and history of this artifacts is available at Picture This

About the Picture This web project: California's Perspectives on American History is a resource for teachers and students to learn about the experiences of diverse peoples of California by using primary source images from the Oakland Museum of California's collections. Organized into eleven time periods spanning from pre-1769 to the present, more than 300 photographs, drawings, posters, and prints tell stories from the perspectives of different ethnic groups. Historical contexts are provided to offer a framework of California's role in relation to American history.

The National Archives state that primary sources, "fascinate students because they are real and they are personal: history is humanized through them." Picture This invites students to examine the historical record, encouraging them to connect history with real people and explore how images tell stories and convey historical evidence about the human experience. History becomes more than just a series of facts, dates, and events.      

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