H4562.16B

1850-1920
2.25 in HIGH
(5.71 cm HIGH)
Mrs. A. Chick
H4562.16B


Set of deep yellow utilitarian pottery (bowls, milk dishes, molds), 11 pieces; blue transferware platter, cake plate, and covered sugar bowl. B: small bowl, flat bottom, flared sides, yellowware. From the History Information Station: Yellowware was factory-produced, usually by a process called slip casting, where successive layers of liquified clay were poured into a mold and allowed to dry. Yellowware has a clear glaze. Yellowware was usually molded in a process called slip casting, where successive layers of liquified clay were poured into a mold and allowed to dry. The result was a bowl with a smooth inner surface and a decorated outer surface. Food was made from "scratch" in the early pioneer kitchen, so large bowls were in constant use for mixing batters and doughs, mashing potatoes,making pie crusts and fillings, and grating nutmeg as shown in this exhibit. Yellowware kitchen utensils were common in most parts of the U.S. between 1850 and 1900. All sorts of bowls, pans, and molds were made of the durable, colorful clay. Inexpensive and versatile, these dishes were used for serving, mixing, and baking in the pioneer kitchen. Molded yellowware mixing bowls were common kitchen utensils in most parts of the U.S. between 1850 and 1900. All sorts of bowls, pans, and pudding molds were made of durable, colorful yellowware. Even cheap pieces could be decorated with pretty designs so they were good for serving as well as mixing and baking. Additional from History Information Station: (HTryon) Object: Mixing, bowls, made of yellow earthenware, or yellowware. Commercially made, probably 1880-1920. Yellowware was factory-produced, usually by a process called slip casting, where successive layers of liquified clay were poured into a mold and allowed to dry. History: Nesting sets of yellowware bowls with white banding were popular all over the U.S. from the 1840s to the 1930s. They have been used in California kitchens since the earliest days of the Gold Rush. The sets included bowls for all kinds of cooking and baking, from tiny ones that held just one cup to big bread bowls that held three gallons. In 1896 you could buy twelve yellowware bowls from a mail order catalog for $3.00 or less. Object: Bowl, of yellow earthenware, or yellowware, with a clear glaze. Yellowware was factory-produced, usually by a process called slip casting, where successive layers of liquified clay were poured into a mold and allowed to dry.

Used: culinary | Cooking

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