H75.177.4

(Sharpshooters of the 1856 Committee of Vigilance)
05/15/56
Museum Purchase
H75.177.4

TLCor: Sharpshooters/ Vig. Com. TRCor: San Francisco/ May 15th 1856 BLCor: 1- Capt Smith/ 2.-1st Lieut. Bannerman/ 3- 2d " Willis BRCor: 3d Lieut. Hayes - 4/ Private Kone - 5/ "Shearer - 6
TOM Silver & Gold: A Preview, September 16, 1995 - January 28, 1996

Vigilance Committee Sharpshooters. Condition: very good. The first Vigilance Committe disbanded in 1851. But there was a continuing perception of violence in San Franicisco. The tide of unrest led to the creation of a second Vigilance Committee in 1856. This second committe set up fortified headquarters known as "Fort Gunnybags," challenged both the state and federal governments, and executed four men it said had escaped justice. This ambrotype shows some of the second Committe's enforcers. From the History Information: Object: Ambrotype of six men: "Sharpshooter -- Vigilance Committee, San Francisco, May 15, 1856. History: The first Vigilance Committee disbanded in 1851. But there was a continuing perception of violence in San Francisco. The tide of unrest led to the creation of a second Vigilance Committee in 1856. This second Committee set up fortified headquarters known as "Fort Gunnybags," challenged both the state and federal governments, and executed four men it said had escaped justice. This ambrotype shows some of the second Committee's enforcers. The ambrotype, a positive image on a glass plate, was a major advance in photographic technology. Ambrotypes were invented in the early 1850s, and replaced daguerreotypes as the favorite form of pictures until the development of paper photographs in the 1860s. Museum Purchase

Picture This Information

This artifiact is part of the OMCA's Picture This website. More about the context and history of this artifacts is available at Picture This

About the Picture This web project: California's Perspectives on American History is a resource for teachers and students to learn about the experiences of diverse peoples of California by using primary source images from the Oakland Museum of California's collections. Organized into eleven time periods spanning from pre-1769 to the present, more than 300 photographs, drawings, posters, and prints tell stories from the perspectives of different ethnic groups. Historical contexts are provided to offer a framework of California's role in relation to American history.

The National Archives state that primary sources, "fascinate students because they are real and they are personal: history is humanized through them." Picture This invites students to examine the historical record, encouraging them to connect history with real people and explore how images tell stories and convey historical evidence about the human experience. History becomes more than just a series of facts, dates, and events.      

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